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Boxing is an extremely difficult sport. It requires years of training to hone the necessary skills and strength needed to succeed. Even then, success is not guaranteed. For those who are just getting into boxing it’s important that you know what pitfalls you should avoid so that you can work towards becoming a successful boxer or fighter quickly.

woman in black tank top wearing black boxing gloves

1.Getting too cocky too fast

This trap is easy for anybody to fall into if they’re successful early on in their career, but one must make sure that it doesn’t become a trend or lifestyle because there will always be somebody younger and hungrier than you looking to take your spot.  When you start out as a novice fighter at the local gym nobody expects much from you; this is good because it lets you get away with a lot of things that wouldn’t fly later on down the line.

However, if you start to win often and become one of the best fighters in your weight class at the gym before moving up (or if you start to fight in different leagues) people will take notice and begin giving you more respect.

Depending on the type of fighter/personality you are this could be good or bad; if can make some fighters cocky and overconfident which leads to them getting knocked out by not-so-great opponents while other fighters use their new reputation as a fear tactic to intimidate their opponent into making mistakes. In both cases it’s important not to lose focus just because somebody else gives you praise for what you’ve

 

2. Don’t talk back to your coach

Yelling at your coach or otherwise showing disrespect is a quick way to lose his respect and trust, and eventually even get kicked off the team. When you open your mouth in a disrespectful manner, you not only hurt others’ feelings, but also lose out on getting critical information about boxing techniques. If he thinks that you have little interest in improving yourself as a boxer, no matter how skilled you are, you will continue to hit a plateau and never progress any further.

3. Don’t trash talk other boxers

No matter how beefy another boxer is or how much experience they have over you, it’s just plain wrong to trash talk them right before boxing them because then all they’ll want to do is take you down and humiliate you. Of course, if they’re talking trash back at you, it’s perfectly fine to let them know what you think about their skills – or lack thereof – but always keep things civil until after the fight.

 

  1. Don’t hit on your coach’s significant other

It doesn’t seem like common sense not to flirt with your coach’s girlfriend (which is usually a terrible idea for those who wish to avoid getting disowned), but sometimes strange things turn out strange even when done by seemingly normal people. If you really want to be friends with your coach and get more tips from him as well as ensure that he won’t kick you off the team, just stay away from his romantic interests.

  1. Don’t practice by yourself

It might be tempting to get a workout in without the coach’s help and supervision, but this is one of the worst things you can do to limit your boxing potential. Having a coach watch you box and tell you what to work on and how to improve is incredibly important if you want to improve not only within his gym, but also gain enough skill for future bouts outside of it (assuming that such fights are legal in your area).

Even practicing with other people at least once every two weeks will help keep your skills sharp while giving you more advice about how to be a better boxer.

  1. Don’t forget all safety rules

To protect both others and yourself, always make sure that even when you think you know everything you need to get your workout done, that you keep the safety of others and yourself at the forefront. Only use equipment belonging to the gym (no borrowing someone else’s gloves or wraps), stay aware of what new boxers are doing so no one gets hurt or starts crying, and never ever hit anyone especially in places where it can damage their eyesight.

Post Author: banditcreekbooks

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